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Date:
29 Aug 2002
Time:
18:34:18
Remote User:

Comments

Just found out about the PACNY web site, it is very interesting, keep up the good work.


Date:
02 Sep 2002
Time:
12:45:53
Remote User:

Comments

Nice site - much needed! I suggest a "contact us" link so people can contribute addnl. information.


Date:
28 Sep 2002
Time:
21:10:07
Remote User:

Comments

This site is wonderful. If you would like info on 377 W Onondaga St, Onondaga Apartments to add to site I have the history and where it is today. Contact me.


Date:
18 Jul 2003
Time:
03:30:50
Remote User:

Comments

My great grandfather was a Rabbi at Chevra Shas, one of the buildings torn down during the urban renewal period. Can you tell me anything about Chevra Shas Synagogue or the rabbi-Rabbi Abraham Jacob Fine-in downtown Syracuse? Any info you give me would be wonderful.-or where to find out more about the Fine (sometimes spelled Fein) family.

I'd suggest you call the Onondaga Historical Association, (315) 428-1864.


Date:
22 Jul 2003
Time:
02:24:37
Remote User:

Comments

Dear Mr. Stanton,

I received a call tonight from WW Wellington's grandson concerning your web site and I'm happy for Mr. Forgan (my cousin) to donate to you any photographs he has that I took for your web site. I applaud you for taking on this project. Best wishes! DC Spitz 7/21/03


Date:
24 Jul 2003
Time:
02:33:15
Remote User:

Comments

This is a remarkable web site hope you will keep updating Tim The 377 Building Co-op Building 377 West Onondaga Street


Date:
08 Aug 2003
Time:
00:37:09
Remote User:

Comments

This is a very informative site. It's a shame to lose so many fine homes. My grandfather (James Hilton) lived at 717 West Onondaga St. for years and now it's gone. It was a beautiful home once. We enjoyed our time there when we were children. He was also the owner of Rogers & Hilton on Pearl St. I recently found a picture of the building on the internet and it's still there. Keep fighting to save the old homes and buildings!


Date:
22 Oct 2003
Time:
18:37:59
Remote User:

Comments

The time has arrived to consider the threatened 300 Block of South Salina Street which may soon fall in the shadow of the expansion of Blue Cross. And in what may be the most egregious impact on main street, a parking garage has been planned. One need only tour your downtown pages to see what has already been lost. Now it seems there are more nominations for the endangered page.


Date:
24 Oct 2003
Time:
00:42:52
Remote User:

Comments

You need to publicize this site better - I only found it by accident.


Date:
09 Nov 2003
Time:
11:42:27
Remote User:

Comments

Hello!

I found an old photograph of a building in Syracuse - Crouse Wholesale grocery. Does this building still exist today?

Armin Schneider


Date:
15 Nov 2003
Time:
02:12:11
Remote User:

Comments

Greetings. This is a wonderful site covering the highs and lows of Syracuse. You are to be commended and awarded. During the late 70s and 80s I lived in the Salts Springs, Meadowbrook, and Arlington areas. I now work in the Loews Landmark Office Building. Its lobby is nicely restored, the elevators are slow and break down occasionally. I enjoy walking around downtown and admiring the architecture.

I believe one prime reason for the decay of Syracuse is the belief that African-Americans are creating a wave of crime and general decadence. Another is the occasional appearance of street people who present no danger, but do detract from whatever aesthetic appeal downtown has. Downtown needs (1) free parking for visitors and shoppers, and (2) to create the impression that downtown is safe.

When this is done, they will come. Again.


Date:
01 Jan 2004
Time:
02:19:48
Remote User:

Comments

I grew up in the Syracuse area and now live in Norwich, NY. I frequently return to Syracuse and love walking through the downtown area. It remains a great old city and PACNY is performing a priceless service to all who love Syracuse. The vacant lot that was once the Yates Hotel is a monument to the mistakes of the past. However, it is not too late to save our remaining treasures. I recently walked through the Hotel Syracuse and it would be nothing less than a tragedy to lose that beautiful legacy. My parents had their wedding reception there. I attended my first high school formal dance there. That building is a symbol of the greatness of Syracuse. It is a gem and it must not be lost. I would like to become involved with your organization and contribute in whatever way I can to help preserve our heritage. This site is outstanding and just as a previous poster indicated, I found it quite by accident. I am very glad that I did. Your work to preserve Syracuse is appreciated.


Date:
02 Jan 2004
Time:
03:25:46
Remote User:

Comments

A really interesting and well done site. My daughter is buying a home in Syracuse and this has really provide a lot of information.


Date:
14 Jan 2004
Time:
13:43:59
Remote User:

Comments

Marvelous site!!

Peter Siegrist, AIA Director of Preservation Services The Landmark Society of Western New York


Date:
21 Jan 2004
Time:
17:50:03
Remote User:

Comments

This site is a true treasure and I thank you for keeping it up and current. I have my own site relating to Central New York and have many links back to this site. Perhaps you could set up a mailing list so we can be emailed whenever there are site changes..

Keep up the good work!

http://www.davidmetraux.com/centralny.html

David Metraux


Date:
10 Feb 2004
Time:
02:48:57
Remote User:

Comments

CONGRATULATIONS! Happened upon your excellent, readable, accessible, visually-pleasing, easily-navigable site which is extensive, yet concise. Interesting, compelling, troubling, empowering, graphically-aided brief intro to Syracuse (and general U.S. urban) history, trends, and future. Excellent. Thank you.


Date:
22 Mar 2004
Time:
23:25:45
Remote User:

Comments

I enjoyed the story of the State Tower Building. One correction: the last name of the early owners was Mayer, not Meyers. I met Albert Mayer in New York a number of years ago. He was an engineer and architect, as well as an owner of buildings, and had a distinguished career.


Date:
06 Apr 2004
Time:
20:46:09
Remote User:

Comments

The site is very cool!! It needs a few minor touch ups but it's lookin good so far. Way to go!!!


Date:
15 Apr 2004
Time:
17:20:06
Remote User:

Comments

Gustave Gutgemon is my Great Great Grandfather. My husband and I will be at the court house tomorrow. I have seen pictures of the murals but never in person, this will be my first trip of many. When I have my own children, I will show them what a wonderful painter my Great Great Grandfather was. It makes my family very happy that this court house still exists.


Date:
26 Apr 2004
Time:
16:15:02
Remote User:

Comments

I used this to write a paper for my sociology class at NC State University. The class focuses on social problems, and your site is definitely explaining one.


Date:
28 May 2004
Time:
18:25:58
Remote User:

Comments

My son lives in Syracuse and the couple of times that I have been to visit him, he has taken me on sight-seeing tours of some of the areas. My opinion of the city is that it is a beautiful, historical city which has areas of blight, but still is striving to keep its roots alive. The Rose Gardens are beautiful (in July, anyway) and the downtown area is a sight to behold.


Date:
11 Jun 2004
Time:
18:13:16
Remote User:

Comments

Onondaga Lament

Some things endure forever and shall never pass away,
like the memory of the places that raised us and where our hearts and memories yet play.
Syracuse is the land of my forefathers, into its soil soaked their sweat and tears;
an iron link was forged forever and cannot be broken by years.

There was a time when her furnaces exploded with the white-hot heat of hell,
but now those furnaces are dark and cold empty, echoing, naught but a shell.
There was a time when her valleys flowed with water black as sin,
now her rivers run clear, cold and silent and her face is so deathly thin.
There was a time when her factories spewed exhaust that blotted the sun,
but now those factories are empty and wet places where we watch vandals ruin and run.

This city answered with pride and solemn sorrow when the republic called her to war;
her mothers bore democracys warriors, in her forges were built democracys armor,
yet that sacrifice is long forgotten, and the republics newest fashions have left her poor.
Her people were young and strong, they were hardworking, stoic and wise,
as they passed their places were never filled and around their graves their city decays and dies.

Punish me not with the memory of her beauty and how I so loved her warm embrace
I have new lives I must attend to. I cannot save her, it is not my place.
Remind me not of her narrow streets and small proud houses, of her stone schools with solid oak trim.
I cannot bear to relive her memory while watching this modern world dashing her in.
Kindle not remembrances of autumn vales where anthracite and leaf smoke doth scent.
She was my first true love and I yet love her. I just cannot bear to watch her descent.

I cannot live in Syracuse anymore yet no matter how far I run I cannot escape her cry.
I can never return to the land of my ancestors because it so pains me to watch her die.


Date:
14 Jun 2004
Time:
14:33:22
Remote User:

Comments

Syracuse; no matter how far you wander it will always be home.


Date:
15 Jul 2004
Time:
01:29:40
Remote User:

Comments

This is a great site. Thanks very much for this chance to stroll down memory lane.

Edward Hutchison Madison, MS


Date:
27 Jul 2004
Time:
18:49:12
Remote User:

Comments

I still remember about Syracuse, NY from 1954 to 1969 on Salina St. and North Salina.


Date:
30 Jul 2004
Time:
23:12:11
Remote User:

Comments

I just spent three hours at this website - it's absolutely wonderful!


Date:
01 Aug 2004
Time:
03:39:04
Remote User:

Comments

I found your site very interesting. I loved the history and pictures. I lived on Coolidge ave in the mid 1960's, not a terrific neighborhood by then, but still grand in architecture. I've been away for 35yr but still call it home.


Date:
19 Aug 2004
Time:
18:07:09
Remote User:

Comments

This is a superb web site with an enormous amount of information. Thank you for putting it all together.  F.O.C.U.S. greater Syracuse will promote the web site to its Stakeholders and anyone who expresses an interest in the Syracuse region.

Charlotte (Chuckie) Holstein


Date:
20 Aug 2004
Time:
14:01:41
Remote User:

Comments

Thank you for the great website about Syracuse then and now. I grew up in Mattydale and moved away in 1980. I now live in Boston, MA. My husband works for the National Park Service (as a Landscape Architect and works on historical reports) and we were talking about the WPA.

I decided to just browse around for some information on Elmwood Park and happened to find your site. It really is a wonderful compilation of information about Syracuse. I even worked at Syracuse Savings Bank in the late 70's and enjoyed viewing information about that.

My Father grew up on Craddock Street and often talked about the wonderful times he spent in Elmwood Park as a child. You really did a wonderful job!

Thank you for a walk through my childhood.


Date:
24 Aug 2004
Time:
22:09:21
Remote User:

Comments

Thanks for this wonderful site. It's true what one guest said about Syracuse always being home.


Date:
29 Sep 2004
Time:
04:27:13
Remote User:

Comments

My name is George Whedon, my father also George and born in Syracuse in 1902. His father was also George and that is all I know about my ancestry. dwhedon2003@hotmail.com.


Date:
07 Oct 2004
Time:
00:54:51
Remote User:

Comments

What a marvelous and thought-provoking site! This is a very nicely planned excursion through the history of this old city. A few years ago in central Florida, I bought an old watercolor painting (an original, painted in 1902) of what was titled on the lower edge, "Old Arsenal Onondaga Valley" built 1812 (signed) H.D. vonKloster

Is this a local person from that period?

At the time, the painting appealed to me because it is nicely done, (although time-worn and unframed), but I had not known where this Onondaga valley was located until I perused my trusty atlas at home later. I found no real information further until I stumbled upon your web-site, and was so pleased to find the arsenal pictured there.

L.Hayden Wilson

P.S. Incidentally, I paid $20.00 for the watercolor!


Date:
07 Oct 2004
Time:
07:02:35
Remote User:

Comments

I never knew that the town that I grew up in was a part of so many important moments in history. The Syracuse i grew up in is nothing like it used to be and it makes me sad that the people in our community don't teach their children about their history. I for one knew nothing of how growing up in Syracuse made me a part of that history and I am once again proud to be from Syracuse, New York. Thank You for all the information that you post and hopefully one day instead of seeing abandoned homes and "thugs" we will see a once again beautiful neighborhood. Thank You. Tasha


Date:
27 Oct 2004
Time:
17:56:30
Remote User:

Comments

I have scanned the 1874 and 1860 maps of Onondaga County. They are available at:
 

Bill Hecht, Union Springs, NY - 315-889-7761.


Date:
03 Nov 2004
Time:
20:36:27
Remote User:

Comments

This is a great website. I found it by accident looking for information on a former Syracuse firehouse that I recently purchased and am doing research for a restoration project which I am about to begin. The house is at the corner of Willis Ave and Chemung Sts. It was Engine 13. If anyone may have any info please contact me @ jcowin@syrfirecu.net. I really would love to locate the blueprints for this building. Thanks, Great Job.


Date:
05 Nov 2004
Time:
16:10:57
Remote User:

Comments

I haven't had time to explore the site thoroughly, but at first glimpse it seems excellent! Looking forward to spending more time enjoying and learning from it.

--Jim Emmons


Date:
08 Nov 2004
Time:
14:51:40
Remote User:

Comments

The Syracuse Developmental Center, once known as the Asylum for Idiots and Imbeciles, and now known as the Central NY Developmental Services office has a rich history in Syracuse since 1853. I see nothing on your site that shows any of this history. I am aware that the office on So. Wilbur Ave, has a museum with many documents and pictorial history. I believe much of the material is still there. Perhaps you could research this material for inclusion on your website

I suspect the State Museum may be helpful. You can contact the Director of the CYNDDSO, Mr. Steve Smits at 800 South Wilbur Ave. Tel. 473-5050.

Leonard M. Slosberg 601 Cherry Rd. Syracuse, NY


Date:
10 Nov 2004
Time:
15:54:59
Remote User:

Comments

In the map of James Street, 1924, there seem to be question marks at 1010 James and 1014 James (Lot 396) I believe they were owned before the turn of the last century by Lighthall and Wyncoop respectively. Nice web site. Thanks for the tour-

Pieter Lighthall Verbeck

pietver@aol.com


Date:
15 Nov 2004
Time:
21:47:30
Remote User:

Comments

I had lunch with a group for New York Bell in 1981 at a place called Sterio's Landmark and I would like to know it is still there? If anyone knows of this place please email me at drbsap@comcast.net.


Date:
19 Nov 2004
Time:
00:37:02
Remote User:

Comments

I am increasingly impressed with the knowledge I discover and learn on your site. I believe it is a must visit for anyone interested in Syracuse, NY

Alan J. Isserlis.


Date:
26 Nov 2004
Time:
13:24:47
Remote User:

Comments

I found Syracuse Then and Now by accident. Members of My Family lived on Mildred Ave for aprox. 80 years. I will continue to visit it often to rekindle memories. Thank You, John Kavanaugh, Largo, Fl.


Date:
29 Nov 2004
Time:
18:33:34
Remote User:

Comments

I love this site, however, i recommend to add more photos. It's great to see great images of this city.


Date:
02 Dec 2004
Time:
20:25:41
Remote User:

Comments

Enjoyed the pic's building shows good even in this state. aji


Date:
03 Dec 2004
Time:
01:29:26
Remote User:

Comments

What I think about Syracuse then ...Many wonderful memories when as a youngster going "downcity" with my Mom was a big treat. Having a hot fudge sundae in Walgreen's and buying candy by the pound in Woolworths. I loved the way the stores were set up with their different departments and the sales clerks who were there to actually help you. I remember the peanut man in front of Planter's Peanuts on Salina, near Jefferson St. The friendly, disabled man who sold the newspapers on the corner across the street from Planter's. He worked there for years. Pete, was his name.

At Christmas all the windows were decorated with the children in mind and when the automated displays came out we were enthralled. Edwards Dept. store had an annex on Clinton Street with some kind of train or rocket ride that was attached to the ceiling. I think it was free to ride it and many stores catered to the kids in the hopes that their parents would spend at their stores. Lots of freebies, not like today. A visit to Santa's lap would get you a free coloring book and a candy cane, at the very least.

Shopping as a teenager, I frequented Lerners, Three Sisters, and Dey Brothers. It was fun running into friends from all over downtown and you got to know people from all over town eventually. The lights at night (Monday and Friday nights stores were open until 9 P.M.) were pretty, especially at Christmas. The Onondaga Bank clock could be seen quite a ways up South Salina Street for the time and temperature. A hot dog on a toasted bun from W.T. Grants was a must, my friend Mary B. worked there so we got to visit and eat together and later hang out and meet our many friends and have some fun.

I grew up in Syracuse in the 50's and 60's living mostly on the south side. The neighborhoods were clean, treed, and fragrant in the summer. People were generally friendly.

My opinion as to what brought Syracuse down was the jobs leaving and absent landlords who only wanted rent money. Of course there were other people who contributed to it's demise.... Bad government, bad choices, urban flight and so on.

There are many people in the different neighborhoods who would like to see Syracuse revived and would help clean them up but they need constructive and well thought out plans. I sometimes think it would be nice if there were mini downtowns in each neighborhood. This would bring in legitimate businesses and would be convenient to the elderly and people who had a hard time getting around.

I think we need more government willing to fund more police teams for the neighborhood. Also look at the things that work. The Westcott area is an example that has maintained a successful close neighborhood and also Eastwood and parts of the Valley. Let's use our assets and set Higher standards for cleanliness and stop tolerating the kinds of behavior that is oh so visible downtown. It's nice to fix up Armory Square, but I think more than enough has been spent there and only serves one segment of the population of our city.

Susan S.


Date:
05 Dec 2004
Time:
06:03:20
Remote User:

Comments

Thanks for assembling this website. I was born in Syracuse in 1954 and lived there until the mid-70s, first on Fayette Street and then on Bruce Street. Do you have any pictures or stories of Rabbi Yallow's synagogue downtown? It was demolished for the construction of Rt 81.

Jack Becker


Date:
06 Dec 2004
Time:
21:46:12
Remote User:

Comments

I really enjoyed reading about my home town and seeing the building my family store (Sadye-Ann's) was located in.

Ann Melissa Goldman Eckert


Date:
08 Dec 2004
Time:
05:56:42
Remote User:

Comments

Thanks for a great website from a native of Massachusetts who's studying history of architecture at SU. Very informative, I learned a lot about Syracuse.


Date:
27 Dec 2004
Time:
01:27:58
Remote User:

Comments

Do you have any more information on the Whalan Brothers Funeral Home? My wife and I are currently looking for a large home to restore and would be interested in this house.

Thanks

Thomas Rhein 758 S. 4th Ave Sioux Falls, SD 57104 t*@yahoo.com


Date:
13 Jan 2005
Time:
03:56:14
Remote User:

Comments

There is one building I feel should be added to your "Particularly Distinguished," list of buildings, that is 315-323 N. Salina Street. This extremely large and highly visible building sits next to the 690/81 North Overpass/Intersection. From what I've been told the building was originally constructed by the Learbury Company and served as a factory and warehouse. Upon construction of the "new" Learbury Building (I put "new" in parenthesis because even the "new" building is still quite old) the old building was converted into residential apartments. I lived there for a period of approximately 18 months from 2001 to 2002. The building is extremely dirty and run-down and in dire need of repair. The greatest obstacles to restoring the property are highway noise, neighborhood crime and lack of parking. I feel this building should be recognized as being Particularly Distinguished due to its dramatic facade with its large windows which offer residents a wonderful view of the city.


Date:
14 Jan 2005
Time:
02:50:31
Remote User:

Comments

Your site is very informative and I can see it grow in the future. Do you have any access to info on past churches?

Can you tell me anything of a church on Roxford Rd built in 1930?


Date:
17 Jan 2005
Time:
17:05:25
Remote User:

Comments

I was trying to research some history on my home, 113 Gertrude Street in the Hawley/Green District of Syracuse. I was advised that your organization might have some insights or information that I could obtain. I am trying to research the home's first owner.

Thanks, Michael Casler email: c*@aol.com


Date:
20 Jan 2005
Time:
00:15:25
Remote User:

Comments

I am looking for some information on the old McMillen<sp> Book Company that I believe was up on the North side of the city. How would I go about finding information on this?

I have called Syracuse home for 37 years now and use to live on Dudley Street, now no one could pay me to live there. Sad to see such a wonderful place like Syracuse fall to crime and ruin.

D.Brant W*681@yahoo.com


Date:
29 Jan 2005
Time:
03:05:26
Remote User:

Comments

This is a great website which I came across attempting to find out about early day transportation (street or trolley cars) in Syracuse.

Our family has a history of well over 100 years living in Syracuse. My mother was born in Syracuse in 1892 and my father arrived through Ellis Island in 1904. My boyhood home was at 115 Green St where I lived until 1943. I last saw this house about three years ago on a return visit to Syracuse and left dismayed by what I saw. It looks in terrible disrepair and probably has been abandoned by its current owner.

My dad ran a bakery with horse drawn wagon delivering bread prior to world war I. During that war, unable to obtain wheat, he closed the bakery and started a delicatessen in the 200 block of James St. which he operated in three different locations in that block until 1959. His last place of business was directly across James St. from the Alhambra.

I have 2 brothers and a sister plus many cousins still living in Syracuse and I return for visits almost every year. One can never forget the place of their birth.

Joseph A. Falcone (JFalcone@AOL.com)


Date:
01 Feb 2005
Time:
22:05:11
Remote User:

Comments

Your website is great! I grew up in Strathmore in the 1950s and loved every minute of it. While that area of town has not changed that much, unfortunately, much of the rest of Syracuse has gotten tired, especially the West Onondaga and downtown areas. Hopefully, it is on the upswing. Thanks again.

Bob Adams


Date:
12 Feb 2005
Time:
02:40:13
Remote User:

Comments

This is John Guidinger of Jackson, Michigan.

Our First Congregational Church was designed by Horatio Nelson White, a prominent architect of your city. It was built by James Morwick, who came from Syracuse to oversee the construction. The church was completed in 1860 and was the muster site for a company of soldiers for a Michigan regiment sent to the civil war.

The church still stands on the square at the corner of Jackson Street and Michigan Avenue. The building exterior is light red brick and the design is Romanesque Revival, similar to some of the White-designed public buildings shown on your website.

We can email a photo of the church building if you are interested.

jhguidinger@cai-engr.com


Date:
24 Feb 2005
Time:
04:28:11
Remote User:

Comments

Thank you for the memories. Looking through the section "Worth Saving", it broke my heart, to see all the beautiful buildings that are gone forever in the name progress. Mr. Stanton you have done a remarkable job, in preserving what Syracuse once was, a wonderful place to grow up. I work in one of the buildings listed, The Lucius Gleason House or Mansion as we call it. I work for the Liverpool Chamber Of Commerce in the Mansion, I love the building. I will put this web site as a reference for inquiries for history of the area. I have found in the south they seem more will to preserve there landmarks and history, where we, destroy ours. If only we could preserve what we have left, and make it a showcase. Thank you once again for all your caring.


Date:
25 Feb 2005
Time:
00:33:35
Remote User:

Comments

To whom it may concern, Probably 15 years ago I purchased the contents of an store in Holyoke, MA., There's an article from the "Syracuse America" 1934 with Helen Eltinge in it during a class by "H. Bennett Buck" In a box was lots of photography. These looked to be very nice and professionally done, also some painting where there.

They seem to be from one family "Eltinge". Some are dated in the 1920's. Helen Eltinge did the drawings and an E.T. Eltinge did the photo's and they are super...there's also a Arthur (?) Eltinge signed on a lot too.

My question is do you have or know a source for the history of these folks? These are just great items and I wanted to track down some history. Thanks so much for your help.


Date:
05 Mar 2005
Time:
18:00:06
Remote User:

Comments

I am looking for information about the house on top of the Penfield manufacturing building. it's very interesting to me, and I'd like to learn more about why it's there.

If you have any information, or know a good source, please email me at coldementia@gmail.com.

thank you.


Date:
05 Mar 2005
Time:
22:04:45
Remote User:

Comments

RE: Jack Becker's 12/5/04 note (Thanks for assembling this website. I was born in Syracuse in 1954 and lived there until the mid-70s, first on Fayette Street and then on Bruce Street. Do you have any pictures or stories of Rabbi Yallow's synagogue downtown? It was demolished for the construction of Rt 81.)

Are you the same Jack(ie) Becker who attended SHDS in an old mansion (next to the JCC on E Genesee St.) in the early 60s?

Marji Gold


Date:
08 Mar 2005
Time:
00:04:37
Remote User:

Comments

Great site!!!!!

Loved the First Baptist Church photo's. The building should be restored as a church.


Date:
10 Mar 2005
Time:
20:38:40
Remote User:

Comments

Hello, I recently relocated to Athens, Ga. from North Syracuse. I used to work for Excellus Blue Cross Blue Shield on S. Warren St. During my lunch hours, weather permitting (about 2 days out of the year =) I would usually walk over to Columbus Circle. On my way I would always pass by this big old, boarded and chained up church looking building. I always wondered what the history of that building was. Old buildings have always fascinated me. I'm so happy that I have come across this website. What wonderful history! I lived in North Syracuse for most of my life and used to go downtown with my friend Linda every Saturday when we were kids and go to all the wonderful stores that used to be there, like Sibley's, Dey Brothers, and Woolworth's. It's for sure not the same downtown, although Armory Square is nice. Could you give a history on the building that now houses the Dinosaur BBQ? I've always wondered about it. (by the way, contrary to popular belief, there's no bbq in the south as good as the Dinosaur's). Thanks again for this great website. Monika Dudley


Date:
14 Mar 2005
Time:
01:42:55
Remote User:

Comments

I must congratulate you on putting together a very creative and informative website.

As the owner of a local pest control company I am able to explore inside hundreds of the older homes throughout the many neighborhoods in the city of Syracuse. Even though many homes have suffered tremendous neglect and are in desperate need of repair, I continue to be amazed by their architecture. They are true gems in the rough. It is easy for me to imagine just how beautiful these homes must have at one time been.

Yet, in many areas there are still meticulously maintained homes and neighborhoods. When I work in the Sedgwick Farms area it continues to remind me of my hometown of Scarsdale, New York, a suburb just north of New York City. It has the same architectural flavor with the Tudor, Colonial Revival and Spanish Revival style homes. There is no doubt in my mind that Syracuse is one of the most beautiful and historic areas in New York. I am grateful that you have put this website up for others to discover what I have come to learn, that Syracuse could easily be considered one of the finest communities in our state.

Michael J Gloyd. President Syracuse Pest Management Inc


Date:
19 Mar 2005
Time:
20:20:46
Remote User:

Comments

Very interesting site, and it encourages me to continue to explore Syracuse history. I am the g-g-nephew of Sylvester House, 1st police chief of Syracuse in the 1850s. I ended up in the police dept. myself - in Chicago, and quite a bit later. Ed Schwarz (Chicago, IL).


Date:
05 Apr 2005
Time:
17:48:32
Remote User:

Comments

My name is Lincoln Hill!!!


Date:
24 Apr 2005
Time:
12:53:27
Remote User:

Comments

I used this website for an analysis of the city of Syracuse's urbanization and the effects of industrialization. It was a wonderful resource. Thank you for maintaining one of the best preservation minded websites I have seen.

RB, Atlanta, Georgia


Date:
25 Apr 2005
Time:
21:50:38
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I'm a Canadian who drove through Syracuse on the weekend looking for a bite to eat. We decided in the end to cover a few more miles before stopping...plus we had trouble finding somewhere on Sunday evening (we went through downtown).

However I was quite taken aback with the magnificence of the historic buildings in your city centre and was saddened that they have fallen into such disrepair. Urban sprawl and the horrible Walmartization of North America is evidenced here to an incredible degree. I hope the fortunes of your historic town recover.

Good luck, tysonmorrow@hotmail.com


Date:
06 Jun 2005
Time:
14:35:08
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I am interested in the 500 block of Second North Street Syracuse NY 13208. These houses are directly across from the Ward Cemetery. I am very interested in learning about the history of the area.


If anyone has any information about the history of the 500 block of Second North Street or links to internet info I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank you.

Date:
25 Jun 2005
Time:
06:33:08
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Terrific trip down Memory Lane, and I found it by accident while researching old Syracuse families and neighborhoods.

I am writing a history of my family and life in post-WWII Syracuse, and this site is great. I grew up in the Italian neighborhoods of the North Side, and I managed to save photos and videos of our home and block before St. Joseph's Hospital tore down everything. It's sad to see so many of those old Italianate homes left in ruin. Whenever I return to Syracuse (I now live in California), I find that something else is gone.

Donna Maurillo, Scotts Valley CA


Date:
25 Jun 2005
Time:
17:51:46
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This website was recommended to me by my childhood friend with whom I reconnected this past January. We both now live in California, but grew up on North Townsend Street.

Our former homes were demolished to accommodate St. Joseph's Hospital. What a blast from the past this website is. I can remember and recognize a lot of the homes and buildings shown. My son still lives there (in Lyncourt). I will be visiting Syracuse in July and it'll be my first time back in 15 years. It will be very surreal, indeed, to go back to my former childhood home that is no longer there, to drive by my home of 18 years in Eastwood and to just see what it's like now in 2005. I absolutely love California, but I've got a lot of history back in Syracuse, New York. I am looking forward to going back for 10 days.


Date:
06 Jul 2005
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04:55:33
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My name is Harold R. Wandle graduated from St Vincent De Paul High School in 1946. I was raised on the east side of town James Street, Boyden street, Teal Avenue, Wilson Street, about Stuart Avenue. Most of my friends still live in Syracuse. We have known each other since 1935. My heart is still in Syracuse.

Since I have left Syracuse I have been in almost every country in the world.. you see I spent 30 yrs in the army and also 16 yrs worhe government. I was just thinking if Sister Jean Baptist saw my typing I would have a horrible death. If anyone wants to contact me here is my address: windywandle@aol.com. Keep up the good work. God bless. Windy.


Date:
07 Aug 2005
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14:57:41
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What a marvelous and nostalgic look at what I had mostly forgotten, having moved away in 1958. I was so amazed at what is now compared to what was then. As a child attending Cathedral Academy (old St. Mary's Academy) and as an altar boy at the Cathedral, and later attended St. Lucy's Academy, I took so much for granted. When I return to Liverpool, where we lived when I left for New York City, and other areas of the Syracuse of my youth, I cannot believe the drastic changes and most were heartbreaking to say the least. Thanks so much for this marvelous site. I have forwarded the information to others who too, share some of my sentiments.


Date:
24 Aug 2005
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15:21:57
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Oh my gosh, where have you been? You've been reading my diary. You absolutely have hit the nail on the head.

The question is, "What can I do"? Me with no political connections and virtually no knowledge of building, planning designing. I grew up in 'Old NYC' where I had a great sense of community. I was dragged at age 17 to Florida, where, whatever charm existed here in 1966, has succumbed to the exact fate you have described here. Looking at your pictures has created a great longing in me to return to some place that really has a community. Belle Harbor, or even Woodhaven has more intrinsic charm than our "downtown". Their paltry efforts to restore some sense of community involves creating one small central area into which they pour an enormous amount of our tax dollars. You still have to drive there and then fight for a parking spot. Sprawl is such an inadequate word to describe what is going on in our town.

Here in St. Lucie County we are experiencing an enormous building boom despite the fact that the last season's hurricanes destroyed house after house. My own house is severely damaged and probably needs to be replaced, after I finish arguing with the insurance company. I so long to build a "real house" in it's place. But that would do nothing to change the ennui that exists here for me. Is there some kind of grass roots organization that I could become a member of?. At the moment I believe the only recourse for me is "Suburban flight" but soon they'll be no where to flee to.


Date:
28 Aug 2005
Time:
01:14:21
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I am looking for Nettleton Shoes. In the '60's & '70's they were the rage. You weren't cool if you didn't have a pair called "the Greensboro," named especially for Greensboro, North Carolina. The main store that sold them was Younts Debut, Greensboro. I sure would like to find a pair for my brother. I remember him having at least 5 pair. I had a navy and a cordovan pair (they were finally made for girls/women).

Can you help me, please? I hope they haven't disappeared altogether.

Thank you, Susan Thomas-Isom


Date:
07 Sep 2005
Time:
20:23:18
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By accident, I came across your website. Thanks for the history lesson which involved my dear Uncle Tom Cabasino.

Patricia Cabasino from Long Island, New York.


Date:
12 Sep 2005
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02:58:13
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I'm Dick Valentine and I was born in Syracuse in 1939. I graduated from LeMoyne College, was married in 1967 and moved away. I'm now living in Atlanta. I really enjoyed this web site.


Date:
14 Sep 2005
Time:
03:47:03
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Syracuse is my home town. I moved to North Carolina 13 years ago. I come home to visit family and friends still. I'm so excited to see this wonderful web site. I remember a lot of these places, and seeing them again brought back so many special memories. And now my children and grandchildren can enjoy seeing them as I tell them the stories about where I grew up. Thank you. Colleen O'Reilly (Burns).


Date:
28 Oct 2005
Time:
20:04:53
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It's because of the views of outfits such as your, that Syracuse will never be what it once was......Stop trying to relive the past and look past your nose. I have a better idea, drive 4 hours south on route 81, and see what happens when you have lower taxes, and growth of such magnitude, that people get tax reductions because there is more tax revenue generated. It's really amazing what a difference in the 2 areas, this area is very backward compared to the central Pa. area, a shame, really a shame. I can't wait to get out of here. I've been here for 2.5 years, and the longer I stay, the more I realize how screwed up, not just this area is, but the whole state.

Best o luck


Date:
07 Nov 2005
Time:
19:04:32
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Was Debby Blake at Deys a real person? The Dey Brothers Catalogs always read "write or call Debby Blake!"


Date:
16 Nov 2005
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15:31:34
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Does anyone have access to photos of the old Hebrew Day School, which was on Genessee Street (more or less across from Allen Street) in the mid-1960s. I'd LOVE to see them!

Malka Esther


Date:
25 Nov 2005
Time:
11:18:01
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If You would like to see more history of Syracuse, and also a vision to incorporate the future visit. www.freemizpah.com


Date:
15 Dec 2005
Time:
18:49:41
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I lived at 377 West Onondaga Street for Four years in the 80's before moving back to Pennsylvania. It was such a wonderful place to live. I miss living there even today. I'm so very glad the building is still around. Leonard Shean.


Date:
20 Dec 2005
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15:20:44
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My great aunt owned a painting by Gustave Gutgemon of a woman playing a lute. It is believed that she and her husband, who was a well known banker in Indiana, bought it, possibly, at an art gallery in Chicago or in San Francisco as those were the two places where they purchased quite a bit of art. We knew nothing about him, although we had tried to search for information.

The painting is going up for auction at BRUNK AUCTIONS in Asheville, NC in their January 7-8, 2006 auction. I hope someone from the Syracuse area will let the woman know, who posted that Mr. Gutgemon was her great, great grandfather. The painting is gorgeous and has a low estimate. Thank you. Barbara Hughes hughesgallery at earthlink.net


Date:
27 Dec 2005
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18:59:11
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You can take the Amos Building off your list. It is now going to be saved, it now is going to be the home of the new C.L. Evers Grocery Store as well as apartments. It's wonderful to have these old buildings saved.


Date:
08 Jan 2006
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23:49:11
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The last sentence under the heading New Venture is incomplete. Otherwise, a nice site. I would like to know more about the railroad chinas, especially the Fred harvey lines. Must have been a pretty substantial contract.

KJ


Date:
10 Jan 2006
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23:32:05
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great site, have many photos of, apparently destroyed, homes in the 1000 block of james st. 1054 and 1100 in particular. sad that they have been replaced by boxes. the widow in 1100 even adjusted all of the shades so that the house would photograph properly. this was in the late 60's.

Howard S Raabe, Jr R.A.


Date:
16 Jan 2006
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14:56:52
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Great site. I'd like more pictures as I am quite visual. Also 868 Ostrom Ave. is a wonderful 1917 home, but your info skirts all around it, Berkeley park, Stratford etc. Do you have any info on this lovely Tudor?  Jim Amodio.


Date:
19 Jan 2006
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22:16:37
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Hello there, I'm sorry I have never been east of Salt Lake City, Utah, the reason that I am looking in you site is that for 5 year of my life I spent it in the Smith Tower, as an elevator operator, and security guard. I really very fond of the Building in Seattle WA. The Bros. Gaggin did a wonderful job. Gary O'Dell


Date:
07 Feb 2006
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13:32:46
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This site is awesome. I didn't know you existed until I saw your web address on eBay for your item ART WORK of SYRACUSE NEW YORK 1899.

Your photos of Edwards Annex prompted a really interesting discussion with my parents this past week. I've only just begun looking through your site - I have to say I really like the photos of the building details and the inside of buildings, as well as the external photos, old and new. The information you provide is excellent.

I'm going to become a member of PACNY along with adding links to your websites to my Onondaga Co USGenWeb website. This is great stuff.


Date:
12 Feb 2006
Time:
22:37:58
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I just found out my father and his family lived in Syracuse from 1900 to 1930. According to the census they lived on South Salina Ave. Our last name is Paul and if anyone has any information on how I might be able to contact any relatives please let me know. My father's name was Victor Hugo Paul and I know he had two brothers, Stanly and Harold as well as three sisters, Ella, Dorothy and Ruth.

Thank you, Stevie Paul Mower


Date:
24 Feb 2006
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22:40:01
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Does anyone know if the old university college buildings on Fayette st in Syracuse are on the national reg. Or who was the designer.


Date:
05 Mar 2006
Time:
20:02:55
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To Stevie Paul Mower

There was a Paul Family who lived on Allen Street in the mid-1960s. The father was a pastor I think, the mother enjoyed playing the piano and sining, they had three kids, the oldest of whom was named Kevin, and an English setter.


Date:
09 Mar 2006
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20:15:47
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I am seeking any information on Henry Ross and Company. This was a cigar manufacturing company at 537 N. Salina St. in 1913. Henry Ross' son, Bill-or William- took over the company when Henry passed in 1929. If anyone has any further information or any articles from this company, please post.


Date:
16 Mar 2006
Time:
04:27:11
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do you know how to get in touch with the Amos Building on Clinton Square regarding the housing thanks, Robert Rschwanke gmail.com


Date:
18 Mar 2006
Time:
01:15:59
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Syracuse Then and Now is a very good site. Keep up the good work. I was born in Syracuse as were my parents and grandparents. We all lived on the north side. I grew up on Bear St. and the 100 blk. of Park St. The map of Jams St. brought back memories. We used to play football on the corner of James and DeWitt Sts. It would be nice to see a picture of the Dey Mansion and the L.C.Smith mansions.


Date:
02 Apr 2006
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13:59:51
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I was a resident of the Mizpah Hotel in 1966 when it was the dormitory for the girls at Onondaga Community College. It was my first 'home away from home'. I met my husband while I was living there. I remember well when he would come to pick me up out front or wait in the lobby. I hadn't thought of the hotel in many years and this morning I was reading a book that reminded me of the hotel. I wondered if it was still in existence and I thought I might take my daughter or my grandchildren back to see it. I was sorry to see it is no longer in operation. I was a music major when I went to Onondaga Community College and I could imagine how wonderful it would have been to listen to a symphony orchestra right there at the hotel. I'll be checking back to see if the hotel is taken over by the Ramada. I would love to come and visit.


Date:
20 Apr 2006
Time:
17:54:03
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This is fantastic. We are including this site in our itinerary for our wedding welcome package.

Thanks, Erin Fraley


Date:
23 Apr 2006
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02:48:17
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Wow, some of the houses are so nice looking, better than some here in Jersey City. My grandmother was from Syracuse and moved to Seattle.

Mark Berge Jersey City, NJ


Date:
07 May 2006
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06:35:44
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Great compellation of information. Keep it updated, love the vintage postcards. More info on Oakwood Cemetery would be nice such as more images or a map.


 
Date:
07 May 2006
Time:
24:48:17
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I am a native Syracusan. My family has been here literally since before Syracuse was Syracuse. My dad's dad was born in 1886 and died in May of 1972 at Crouse Hospital just 2 months before I was born. My brother was born at Crouse on September 23, 1970 and died there on September 22, 1992. He lies at rest at Woodlawn Cemetery in the beautiful mausoleum facing Grant Blvd. I live directly across from the First Ward Cemetery, Syracuse's oldest cemetery.

I am blessed with a beautiful young wife and 5, as of August 06, healthy happy children. I have absolutely no plans of leaving Syracuse. I was born here and I will die here. I am on the verge of turning 34 and it is at this point in many people's lives that they reflect on the importance of life. I have lost many members of my family who lived there entire lives on this earth we call Syracuse. I am privileged to live just two blocks from Hiawatha blvd where my grandmother worked at the candle factory until her death in 1979 at the age of 64.

Every time the Chiefs have a home game, I hear the crack of the bat and the roar of the crowds and I remember from so long ago when my dad would take me and my brother to a game. Some of my fondest memories are going to the Farmer's market as a young boy amongst the crowds of people who don't mind walking at a "snails pace" to get to their favorite vendor. It is a wonderful tradition that I get to share with my children today.

This city is so rich in history, tragedy and triumph for me and the many many souls that have called it home before me. It is a city worth saving, worth loving and worth cherishing for the generations of Syracusans to come.

I urge anyone who left Syracuse, or anyone who longs to live in a real community, to come to back. We will welcome you and assure you will never regret your return and will never want to leave again.

Date:
09 May 2006
Time:
19:00:48
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Nice site. I would add more images to the site especially vintage ones.


Date:
09 May 2006
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19:03:50
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A links page would be good. If you had a page linking to other sites about Syracuse it would benefit both you and them, like a banner exchange.


Date:
13 May 2006
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14:24:43
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Love this city. Used to be at Syracuse University during 1960s and loved Nettleton shoes. At the time I could not afford new ones but bought factory seconds at the Nettleton factory showroom and still have some of them. At 40 years of age and after 40 years of wear and 4 or 5 complete heel and sole replacements, my black wingtips still look and wear great, as well as my dark brown cordovan brogans. So sad one time when I tried to find the telephone number for Nettleton so I could buy more of their penny loafers, the company was no longer in business. Wish some knowledgeable person would put together a history of the Nettleton company.

Ivan R. Vernon


Date:
22 May 2006
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15:32:31
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I've traveled to Europe numerous times, most recently to the former E Germany. Cities like Dresden, Berlin, Quedlingberg and Goslar have incredible restoration projects that, as you know, help to create urban tourism and increase the local population. I don't think that the general population has any idea of the grants available for restoring Syracuse's gems. They are quick to dismiss any idea due to the cost and time involved. A press campaign of articles including now and conceptual after photos would show what is possible with the historic buildings. Everyone can appreciate visuals, and comparisons to other successful projects would be helpful. The restoration projects could involve a modern approach on the less historic buildings as well. The best cities preserve what they have and encourage new exciting and controversial forms.

On a related point, the use of the term luxury, that local apartment developers are so fond of using does little to attract young talented college grads and creative thinkers. If they've never cracked open an issue of the uber hip, form and function based magazines such as Dwell, Frame, or Wallpaper, they're missing out on knowing what attracts much of the young, highly educated urban dwellers.

Anne


Date:
24 May 2006
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04:45:13
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Love This Then And Now


Date:
02 Jun 2006
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03:54:05
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This was a very helpful site. I am searching for Swiss family, Warth and Luchsinger, arriving mid to 1830's. Marie Reedy, Fairborn, Ohio.


Date:
02 Jun 2006
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03:54:05
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This was a very helpful site. I am searching for Swiss family, Warth and Luchsinger, arriving mid to 1830's. Marie Reedy, Fairborn, Ohio.


Date:
14 Jul 2006
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06:17:14
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Awesome. I lived at 377 West Onondaga. I manage the Pastime Athletic Club. I own homes at Elmwood park.

Anthony Corcoran


Date:
16 Jul 2006
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02:45:51
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This site is superb. May I suggest a WIKI so additional information can be added. Merely a suggestion. A truly wonderful resource, thank you.


Date:
18 Jul 2006
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20:00:14
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This site really depresses me. The city had or has so much potential.

I left Syracuse and am glad that I did. Those running the city are incompetent.


Date:
24 Aug 2006
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12:54:03
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Great and very informative site. I will share this link with family and friends.

Thank you.


Date:
25 Aug 2006
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21:07:28
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This a wonderful site describing the rich history of the city. I live in Madison, WI., but as a native of Syracuse and resident in the 1950 and 60's in the South Geddes Street-Most Holy Rosary Church area, I certainly appreciated the comprehensive approach of this site, especially captivating are the photos and post cards of the city landmarks, including neighborhoods during its earlier times.

Significant memories include sledding at the Woodland Hills Reservoir, playing at Onondaga Park, using the then safe city bus service to attend high school sport events throughout the city, walking to Archibold Stadium with friends on a beautiful fall Saturday for a SU game, of course with the hope of sneaking in, and being able to conveniently shop downtown when needed.

Syracuse was a great place to live and grow up, and will always be my hometown. Congratulations on developing this excellent resource on the web.


Date:
07 Sep 2006
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20:01:19
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I WOULD LIKE TO KNOW IF I CAN GET A SET OF ROXBURY CHINA FOR MY SON WHO IS IN THE ARMY. HE HAS BEEN IN IRAQ 3 TIMES AND I WOULD LIKE TO SUURPRISE HIM WITH A SET OF ROXBURY CHINA BECAUSE THAT IS OUR LAST NAME. THANK YOU.---MRS ROXBURY


Date:
12 Sep 2006
Time:
11:21:35
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Love your web site. I wish I had read the comments from others before sending you a direct e-mail earlier this morning.

Our family lived there 1947 till 1956. I thought my request for any info on the house and neighborhood of 1312 Madison, between Beech and Cherry Sts., would be too long for this comment space. If it's possible, I hope you will post my e-mail here also.

Someone mentioned Hiawatha Blvd. My aunt and uncle lived at 410 E. Hiawatha near the Ball Field. We spent a lot of time there with my cousins, one of which still owns the property. My Mom worked at Dey Bros for a while, I remember her taking us shopping there, also at Edwards and at Lerners. And the Fanny Farmer store on the downtown corner, waiting for the bus.

We went to St Josephs Little French Church on Genessee St. There was a large toy store across the street from the Church. I made my First Communion and Confirmation in that church, and my brother was baptized and had his First Communion there also. I also remember Sunday dinners at the Yates and Syracuse hotels and at Tubbards. My grandparents' 50th Anniversary dinner was at Tubbards.

And Thornden Park, what a child's paradise. Ice skating, sledding down Tower Hill, the lilac grove and the lily pond, just for starters. I also had mentioned in my e-mail that my grandparents lived at 112 Spring Lane, at the top of the Pond Lane hill. My Mom was born in that house in 1916 and went to North High School. Would love to hear from anyone interested in those good old days.

Thanks. Ann Sanchez 12 Sep 06, snoleppard42@aol.


Date:
13 Sep 2006
Time:
01:14:26
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A helpful guide to the variability of the growth of Syracuse over this social and economic continuum. Thank you for taking the time.

Megan Munsell, Refugee from Maben, Mississippi


Date:
18 Sep 2006
Time:
22:25:30
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This is a copy of the e mail I sent to your web site on Sep 12 2006. Later I found the Comments section and in them, referred to this e mail. So this is just more of what I wanted to say ...

Hello, I was pretty much raised in Syracuse, which was my mother's home town. Just came across your website more or less by accident when I Googled Thornden Park. I looked through your Neighborhood links but couldn't find ours.

My parents, brother, and I lived at 1312 Madison St from 1947 till 1956. We left when I was 13 and I never got to go back to the old neighborhood. Our house was the 3rd up on the right from the intersection of Madison, Beech, and Maple Sts. One corner of Thornden Park was at that intersection, and all us kids in the neighborhood practically lived in that park. Cherry St was at the other end of our block of Madison. We were several blocks from Westcott St, which was our local shopping center. We were at the other side of the Park from Syracuse University.

I attended the Original Sumner School starting in Kindergarten with Miss Bly in 1947. The school was closed for demolition during the summer of 1953, and the entire school population was moved over to the T. Aaron Levy Jr. High School. Those of us still in the Elementary School population were considered to be in Sumner Levy. That was 6th grade, then went on to 7th and 8th grades in the same building, once you were in 7th grade, you were a Levy Jr High student.

The September I started 8th grade 1955 my younger brother and the other elementary school students were transferred back to the what was then the New Sumner School, built on the grounds of the old building. He only went there 1 year and during the summer of 1956, our family moved to the Buffalo area, as my father was transferred up there.

My mother was born in Syracuse in 1916 at her parents home at 112 Spring Lane at the top of Pond Lane. She graduated from North High School. There was only 2 houses on Spring Lane during the 50s and 60s, when we would visit my grandparents. My grandparents lived in that house till their deaths in the late 1960s, when it was sold. I have many old photos that belonged to my Mom, but the explanations of who and where have been lost.

I do apologize for writing so much, I have so many wonderful memories of my childhood in Syracuse.

Sincerely, Ann Sanchez Titusville FL: snoleppard42 at aol


Date:
25 Sep 2006
Time:
14:15:18
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It is nice to show the kids what Syracuse look like when their grandfather talks about some of the old stores that used to be here. also would like to know more about the house we are renting on the northside we now it was build in the 1900 would like to know who built it and if it was part of the old cemetery that was where Wegmans is today we live at 735 pond street by first north thank you hope


Date:
30 Sep 2006
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01:15:09
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My great great grandfather, Charles Schlosser, to the best of my knowledge lived in Syracuse in the mid-1800s. He was born in Sankt Julian in Bavaria, Germany in 1825 and died in Syracuse January 19, 1894. He is reported to be buried in Woodlawn Cemetery. He was a wagonmaker. Your wonderful site Syracuse Then and Now hopefully show some of the places he saw .... He and Katharina Schlosser had five sons.


Date:
04 Nov 2006
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14:23:40
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Fascinating site...it both brought back memories and taught me a lot. I'm a native Syracusan, from the Valley, and fondly recall many trips downtown on Syracuse Transit -- that's Centro's predecessor for you youngsters -- during the sixties. I last visited in 2002, and recall that much of the city, such as Elmwood sadly looked rundown, victim of a shrunken tax base and suburban flight. Conversely, in my youth the Armory area -- no one then called it Armory Square -- was in that shabby condition, although it's sad to see downtown has no more department stores such as Dey's, Edwards, which was connected to Mohican Market, Chappell's, Witherill's and later Sibley's, for which the RKO Keith and Paramount movie houses were sacrificed. Then again, so have Loblaw's supermarkets.


Date:
11 Nov 2006
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11:39:04
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Thank You for the beautiful memories. I am proud to say I am from Syracuse. It will always be home. Sincerely, John Kavanaugh Largo, Fl.


Date:
22 Nov 2006
Time:
11:19:20
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Please, any info on Uarda, mansion on James St. that taken down probably early '60's. I believe is was the L.C. Smith house. I got to look in the windows back in 1962, yes, trespassing, would like any info on web sites or books I could find about the house. Donna


Date:
06 Dec 2006
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13:10:01
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The site is beautifully done. Hope to see more and more in the future.


Date:
10 Dec 2006
Time:
13:10:56
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Seeking further history on the industrial endeavors of the Alexander Brown family. IE Julian Brown, JULE ENGINE COMPANY and B F Brown, B F BROWN marine engine company, until 1912. BF BROWN associated with LEVI CASE . Both Firms removed to Schenectady to continue in business. HELP


Date:
29 Dec 2006
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19:24:00
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A great web site. Enjoy reading the updates. I still live at 377 West Onondaga St. what a great building this has become. More people need to preserve historic sites Timothy Wentworth


Date:
01 Jan 2007
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11:13:12
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Again, this is a valued resource for research. The historic images are a treasure.

Paul Malo


Date:
03 Jan 2007
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18:04:34
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Fascinating. I learned things I never dreamed of. Thanks so much.


Date:
05 Jan 2007
Time:
17:22:56
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Why not show present time pictures. I was born and raised in Syracuse and am ashamed to call it my hometown. The streets are lined with trash and vandalism. The old beautiful homes are tainted with code violations. Drive down West Onondaga but, be sure to lock your doors and wear a helmet. What route does the Mayor take to and from work. How can he not see the lack of maintenance. The economy is hurting. It has been for sometime. Education is lacking. Crime is present and frequent. Jobs, where are they? I too once wore blinders and loved Syracuse. I loved to read the Syracuse newspaper. When it actually reported news. That to is tainted. My Mother owns her home on Bellevue Ave. She has for 30 years. She has become victim to the filth and crime. So I ask why is Syracuse a great place to live?


Date:
27 Jan 2007
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22:21:53
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I grew up in Manlius, left the area after graduating High School, and am now planning to return with my wife and kids. We are both graduate degree'd professionals who have spent 10 years in the NYC area and want a reasonable cost of living without sacrificing an enriching environment, culture, and the company of educated, progressive people.

We have been concentrating our efforts looking in Fayetteville, because of the schools but also the charm and historic character of the village. After browsing your website, and particularly after watching Doug Sutherland's slide presentation, I am inspired to want to participate in the revitalization of the Syracuse core community.

Thank you for providing such an articulate, informative, progressive, and positive set of ideas. Those of us who want to make a real life in Syracuse are indebted to the authors and contributors on this website.

Patrick J. Heaton


Date:
20 Feb 2007
Time:
20:34:37
Remote User:

Comments

This is a terrific site. Our History is very important, so please lets not forget our past. It seems to me that progress is far too often not positive or in our best interest. We step on our own feet, trying to get somewhere, when the here-and-now is a far better place. Slow down, enjoy where we are, take in the view, be kind to others.


Date:
31 March 2007
Time:
21:57:07
Remote User:

Comments

What a wonderful site!! I learned so much about Syracuse - looking at the maps from 1860 and 1874 and reading through all the historical documentation!! I loved all the old postcards - it was great to see what Syracuse looked like when my grandparents and their ancestors lived there!! Truly a job well done!

I'd love to see more old maps and postcards!!


Date:
16 Apr 2007
Time:
14:13:41
Remote User:

Comments

What a nice website.

My g,g,g grandparents, Austin and Mary Cronin, settled in Syracuse in the 1850's. They lived for many years at 425 Jackson Street. From articles in the Syracuse Herald, I've learned that Austin was a street sweeper and worked in bank alley.

It's great to be able to see pictures of Syracuse as Austin and Mary would have experienced it.

Thanks,

James Pridmore


Date:
02 May 2007
Time:
13:38:28
Remote User:

Comments

Beautiful images. Thank you for your excellent work.


Date:
15 May 2007
Time:
19:38:28
Remote User:

Comments

I enjoyed the Syracuse Then and Now website but I would like to see some recent articles of progress within the city. I also noticed that there was nothing on the history of the railroads and I think that that is very important to address.

Thanks alot


Date:
15 Jun 2007
Time:
09:25:53
Remote User:

Comments

I have a question about the Leavenworth Apartments at 615 James Street. The old photo on the website shows a building that looks to be twice as big as what's there now. Was there a fire, partial demolition, etc.

Benjamin Gembler

ps Thanks for posting the Hawley-Green plan online. It makes access so much easier.
 

Benjamin, send us your email address: pacny@usadatanet.net
 


Date:
19 Jun 2007
Time:
17:06:46
Remote User:

Comments

I found this site by accident. I grew up on Tipperary Hill, and have many fond memories. I've lived in S. Florida for many years but will always call Syracuse home.

Thank you for the walk down memory lane.


Date:
26 Jun 2007
Time:
09:38:36
Remote User:

Comments

If anyone is interested in how like-minded groups in other cities are approaching the subjects of memory and architecture as well as historic preservation, do visit the website of forgotten-ny.com It is a fascinating site, much like this one, and perhaps even more ambitious in some respects.


Date:
06 Jul 2007
Time:
18:15:18
Remote User:

Comments

I grew up in Eastwood from 1950 to present What I hate to see is all the individual stores along James St being taken up by large companies like Pomco and books and memories. My grandfather Patrick Austin use to be the superintend of Ellis Court apts. The stores facing James was a paint store a book store a restaurant a hat shop and mars store. and a hat shop. You could walk down James St and find any thing you want. Lets bring back the old Eastwood. Mike Kinahan


Date:
29 Aug 2007
Time:
11:38:22
Remote User:

Comments

I would love to see any photos you may have of victors beauty salon in the state tower building in 1946. I am very interested in all of this history in the early 1900 to the mid to late 1900's. I am a 17 yr old teen that loves to know about history. My name is Frank Switzer and i am from Syracuse ny and every chance i get to use a computer that's all i like to look up. So please respond to my request asap. Thank you so very much and can't wait to see all you can offer.


Date:
31 Aug 2007
Time:
04:33:08
Remote User:

Comments

Really enjoyed the site. I am researching the life of O J Lefaivre who had music parlors on South Salina and James Streets c1880s. Anyone come across him Would be most interested to hear from you.


Date:
07 Sep 2007
Time:
20:31:28
Remote User:

Comments

Thank you for this wonderful website. I attended college, lived and worked in Syracuse and some of its surrounding communities from 1971 - 1999 when I moved to NC to care for my parents. They have since passed on and I am moving back to the Syracuse area. I am so excited to be coming home. Keep up the good work. C. Peters


Date:
09 Sep 2007
Time:
15:33:55
Remote User:

Comments

Very nice site. I lived, studied and worked in Syracuse for 12 years, until 1989, and still have a soft spot in my heart for it and its great history.


Date:
08 Jan 2008
Time:
09:38:38
Remote User:

Comments

In the section about Arch. Russell and the Burrell house in Little Falls, there is some misinformation. The house itself used mortar in its construction but the large retaining walls for the roads and even at the house did not. The article implies that no mortar was used in the house.

E. Burrell Fisher - a great-grandson of D. H. Burrell


Date:
30 Jan 2008
Time:
11:48:19
Remote User:

Comments

I was born in Utica in 1928. Our family mover to Syracuse in 1935. we live on the east side of town Boyden and Wilson street, also Real Ave and James Street. I went to school at St. Vincent de Paul high from kindergarten to high school. I worked at several places: Edwards and sons, Syracuse stamping company, Easy Washing Machine Corp, Syracuse Chiefs Ballpark, Lowe's Theater, the railroad and several other places. We left Syracuse in 1945 when my mother passed away at the tender age of 42.

I love Syracuse. It will always be my hometown even though I lived in Hawaii for 25 years. I retire from the army after 30 years. I am old so I would like to contact my friends from my home town. Thank you for you help.


Date:
29 Feb 2008
Time:
00:51:56
Remote User:

Comments

you should, ask people to submit old Syracuse photos in scanned form and create an online database or photo map.


Date:
22 Jul 2008
Time:
08:47:04
Remote User:

Comments

I sincerely believe that Syracuse should consider re-vamping at least part of the actual canal in the downtown area. It would be a great attraction and would bring more visitors to this area. And I really appreciate all the old photos....wonderful. Cynthia Kennedy

 



Copyright 2002 by The Preservation Association of Central New York. All rights reserved. Revised: November 04, 2008.

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